Blog Archives

Devil’s DVD Advocacy: Friends with Benefits

When it comes to relationships, there’s always that age-old question of “Can there be a physical relationship without the emotional?” Well, Hollywood decided this year to give us two tales of it. Earlier in the year, Ashton Kutcher and Natalie Portman starred in No Strings Attached and now Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis give us another take on the subject in Friends with Benefits.

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Friends with Benefits

When it comes to relationships, there’s always that age-old question of “Can there be a physical relationship without the emotional?” Well, Hollywood decided this year to give us two tales of it. Earlier in the year, Ashton Kutcher and Natalie Portman starred in No Strings Attached and now Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis give us another take on the subject in Friends with Benefits.

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Devil’s DVD Advocacy: Black Swan

Black Swan is a movie about ballet.  Men and women dancing in unitards to orchestral music.  Ballet.  Wait…no.  It’s not about ballet. It’s about the principle of morality.  NO…BALLET!!!  MORALITY!!!  BALLET!!!   I’m really of two minds on the issue.

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Episode 57: Black Swan

While Expendables was billed as the manliest film of the year, we at The Devil’s Advocates Movie Review Podcast beg to differ.  This week Jonathan, Rene, and Mike discuss Black Swan and all of its manly splendor.

Give us a listen because Nina the Ballerina would want you to…or would she?

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Check out our written reviews at http://www.devilsadvocatesmoviereviews.com and email us at devilsadvocatesmovies@gmail.com.

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Black Swan

Black Swan is a movie about ballet.  Men and women dancing in unitards to orchestral music.  Ballet.  Wait…no.  It’s not about ballet. It’s about the principle of morality.  NO…BALLET!!!  MORALITY!!!  BALLET!!!   I’m really of two minds on the issue. Read the rest of this entry

Devil’s DVD Disappointment: Book of Eli

Every actor gets to a point where they want to do a vanity project simply for vanity’s sake. Book of Eli is Denzel Washington’s vanity project. Washington, the son of a Pentecostal preacher, plays the protagonist in the film who carries a shotgun and a sword, but his main weapon is his faith.

Episode 10: The Book of Eli

In Episode one we explored the post-apocalyptic landscape of The Road, so it only seems appropriate that we revisit it in our Book of Eli discussion, here in Episode ten.

Listen as Mike and Veer discuss gas masks, the Bible, and the newest, lush vacation spot, Alcatraz. 

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Extract (Devil’s Advocate Review)

First, and foremost, a lot of what I will say, deals with the writer/director Mike Judge, whom coming off a short hiatus from his last directorial film, Idiocracy (2006) is hungry to put the tongue-in-cheek comedy back onto the main stage. His main staple, his claim to fame, is the two animated characters of Beavis & Butthead. Knowing that at least some point in the ninety’s you’ve heard of these two colorful characters, gives you a slight idea of how the mind of Mike Judge works. Further more, if you haven’t seen his film Office Space, or are unfamiliar with the film, it is HIGHLY recommended you see it first, even before you read any further into this review. I guarantee that film will set the tone of how interested you may become in spending 10+ bucks to see Extract.

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Extract

After a hiatus to tackle more existential realms (Idiocracy), Mike Judge returns to the normal, everyday working world with Extract.  He trades in his white collar heroes/criminals of Office Space for a grungy, factory blue one, but fails to find the hilarity that made his first film a cultural phenomenon.

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