Blog Archives

Devil’s DVD Advocacy: Source Code

Source Code is the latest film from Duncan Jones, the up-and-coming director who you may remember from 2009’s wonderful sci-fi thriller Moon. The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal as Colter Stevens, a US Air force pilot who finds himself part of a military experiment that allows for transferring the mind of a living person into the mind of a deceased person. The process is limited though, it only allows the living person to experience the last eight minutes of the deceased’s life before death. Colter is tasked with experiencing the repeated last eight minutes of the life of a schoolteacher who died aboard a train headed to Chicago. I won’t attempt to explain the quantum physics aspect of the story but he essentially is allowed to freely act as this person in an alternate timeline but returns to the real world upon death. Along for the ride is co-worker Christina Warren, played by Michelle Monaghan. Colter’s mission is to find a bomber who was aboard the train in the past and is believed to be planning to detonate a large bomb in downtown Chicago in the real world close future. Confused? Well imagine if Bill Murray’s character in Groundhog Day was aware that he would be reliving Groundhog Day and was actually a soldier looking for a suspected terrorist bomber. Got it?

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Actor Spotlight: Proof

With our May’s Actor Spotlight of Anthony Hopkins coming to an end, I close out the month with 2005’s Proof.  Up to a few weeks ago I never heard of the film so I did a quick IMDB search to get  a feel for what I was in for.  Many compared this film to 2001’s A Beautiful Mind with Russell Crowe but since I didn’t see that film I won’t be doing any comparisons of my own.

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Source Code (Devil’s Advocate Review)

Sci-fi in Hollywood in the last few decades has for the most part descended into a circular, self-fulfilling argument for factory-produced garbage. Studios produce multi-million dollar projects involving nothing more than wisecracking robots, CGI explosions, and hot girls in short skirts swinging samurai swords, and people go to see them because there’s nothing else out there. Studios make back their investments to justify another round of wisecracking robots, explosions, short skirts, and swords, and people go to see them because there’s nothing else out there. Luckily, we have moviemakers like Duncan Jones to help us prove the case that there’s plenty of “something else” out there. Source Code is exactly the sort of thoughtful, provocative, naturalistic, and rewarding hard sci-fi for which fans always cry out, and which actually do exist out there in the world, as long as you’re willing to look for it.

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Source Code

Source Code is the latest film from Duncan Jones, the up-and-coming director who you may remember from 2009’s wonderful sci-fi thriller Moon. The film stars Jake Gyllenhaal as Colter Stevens, a US Air force pilot who finds himself part of a military experiment that allows for transferring the mind of a living person into the mind of a deceased person. The process is limited though, it only allows the living person to experience the last eight minutes of the deceased’s life before death. Colter is tasked with experiencing the repeated last eight minutes of the life of a schoolteacher who died aboard a train headed to Chicago. I won’t attempt to explain the quantum physics aspect of the story but he essentially is allowed to freely act as this person in an alternate timeline but returns to the real world upon death. Along for the ride is co-worker Christina Warren, played by Michelle Monaghan. Colter’s mission is to find a bomber who was aboard the train in the past and is believed to be planning to detonate a large bomb in downtown Chicago in the real world close future. Confused? Well imagine if Bill Murray’s character in Groundhog Day was aware that he would be reliving Groundhog Day and was actually a soldier looking for a suspected terrorist bomber. Got it?

Read the rest of this entry

Devil’s DVD Disappointment: Love and Other Drugs

My dad worked in a hospital lab when I was growing up, and I distinctly remember a point sometime in the early 90s when suddenly our house became flooded with pens, notepads, coffee mugs, what have you, all emblazoned with drug names and drug company logos. I remember being weirdly fascinated by all the strange, long chemical names (usually containing more “z”s than I thought possible for any word in the English language) and their zippier nicknames, wondering what all these drugs really did and, more importantly, where all these free office supplies came from. And now, twenty years later, I finally have an answer: they come from a-holes. Read the rest of this entry

Love and Other Drugs

My dad worked in a hospital lab when I was growing up, and I distinctly remember a point sometime in the early 90s when suddenly our house became flooded with pens, notepads, coffee mugs, what have you, all emblazoned with drug names and drug company logos. I remember being weirdly fascinated by all the strange, long chemical names (usually containing more “z”s than I thought possible for any word in the English language) and their zippier nicknames, wondering what all these drugs really did and, more importantly, where all these free office supplies came from. And now, twenty years later, I finally have an answer: they come from a-holes. Read the rest of this entry

Devil’s DVD Disappointment: Prince of Persia

Mike and his tour guide, Veer, head to the Middle East, mingle with the Sex and City girls, all while trying to avoid those pesky Brits pretending to be Persians.

This episode we discuss Prince of Persia, Bruckheimer syndrome, and a general lack of effort seen in films today.

And visit our sponsor at http://audiblepodcast.com/devilsadvocates for your 14 day free trial and a free audiobook of your choosing.

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Episode 26: Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time

Mike and his tour guide, Veer, head to the Middle East, mingle with the Sex and City girls, all while trying to avoid those pesky Brits pretending to be Persians.

This episode we discuss Prince of Persia, Bruckheimer syndrome, and a general lack of effort seen in films today.

And visit our sponsor at http://audiblepodcast.com/devilsadvocates for your 14 day free trial and a free audiobook of your choosing.

iTunes Feed:

http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=343227972

RSS Feed:

http://pamp47.libsyn.com/rss

Brothers (Lil Devil Review)