Blog Archives

Drive

“If I drive for you, you give me a time and a place. I give you a five-minute window, anything happens in that five minutes and I’m yours no matter what.”

Every now and then, I am genuinely surprised by a movie. I try to avoid trailers as much as possible now because they tend to show all of the good scenes of a movie. I don’t really read movie reviews too much either for the same reasons. I don’t mind spoilers, but movie reviewers and critics love to give specifics for everything. Which inevitably ends up spoiling something. I might see a movie because of its director or star, but lately I’ve been seeing a lot of stuff at random. Drive is a movie that I knew almost nothing about before seeing it other than the fact that it starred the guy from The Notebook (Ryan Gosling) and looked like a throwback to the car chase movies I had seen as a kid (Bullit, The French Connection). Drive turns out to be the best surprise for me at the movies this year.

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Devil’s DVD Advocacy: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

It was 1987 when Michael Douglas portrayed a character so profound, that despite Director Oliver Stone’s intentions, the character became an icon.  That character was Gordon Gekko and he became the symbol for what was wrong in the late 80’s with Wall Street.  It has been 23 years since Douglas uttered those famous words “Greed is Good” and as he reemerge’s from the shadows of obscurity, he brings with him a sense that what is wrong with Wall Street is not just Wall Street but us.  Oliver Stone in this sequel once again tackles the question of  how money can erode a man’s ethics.

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Episode 41: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

Toor channels his inner day trader and leads Mike through the world of stocks, bonds, and investment fraud. Listen as they discuss Michael Douglas the veteran, Carey Mulligan the set prop, and Shia the beef.

Give us a listen and hear our predictions of stocks most likely to tank in 2011.

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Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

It was 1987 when Michael Douglas portrayed a character so profound, that despite Director Oliver Stone’s intentions, the character became an icon.  That character was Gordon Gekko and he became the symbol for what was wrong in the late 80’s with Wall Street.  It has been 23 years since Douglas uttered those famous words “Greed is Good” and as he reemerge’s from the shadows of obscurity, he brings with him a sense that what is wrong with Wall Street is not just Wall Street but us.  Oliver Stone in this sequel once again tackles the question of  how money can erode a man’s ethics.

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Never Let Me Go

The Hailsham school is much like any British boarding school you’ve seen in countless movies. The students are bright-eyed, wear uniforms, and sing at assemblies. They play ball and run around the grounds. They engage in light mischief and get lectured by stern schoolmarms. They check in and out of buildings with wrist monitors, begin each day with complex drug cocktails, and are afraid to set foot outside school grounds lest they be kidnapped, maimed, murdered, worse.

Wait…what?

Never Let Me Go is science fiction, and the best kind of science fiction – the kind that is “about” far more than what it is “about”, and asks more questions than it answers.

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Awards and Award Season: Golden Globes 2009

Most people usually see the Golden Globes as the pre-cursors and foreshadowers of the Academy Awards, but there’s one big difference: Best Picture is divided into Drama and Musical/Comedy. This allows for a lot of variety, plus two winners in each of the biggest categories: Picture, Actor, and Actress. The Director, Screenplay, and Supporting Actor/Actress awards are lumped together, so it becomes a bit more prophetic of the Oscar race than the others (for example, the winners of Best Actor were Sean Penn (the eventual winner) and..ahem…Colin Farrell). This year’s three front-runners for Best Picture-Drama (and the coveted Best Picture Oscar) are Up in the Air (likely for Screenplay), The Hurt Locker (likely for Director, unless the “King of the World” has any say about it) and Precious (which is more actor-driven than production), with blockbusters Avatar and Inglourious Basterds weak competition. The Best Picture-Musical or Comedy section has the same variety: indie darling (see my piece on the Spirit Awards) vs. big-budget musical (the most viable candidate) vs. silly comedies (The Hangover? way to defy expectations, you snooty critics). Here’s the full list: http://www.goldenglobes.org/nominations/ Read the rest of this entry

An Education (Lil Devil Review)

Sometimes, the simplest stories are the most effective. There doesn’t need to be any surprising plot twists or flashbacks-within-flashbacks; the key to a great movie (especially in the coming-of-age genre) is to just be as genuine and believable as possible. Thus is the case with An Education, a new British film directed by Danish-born Lone Scherfig and adapted by Nick Hornby (High Fidelity).  It’s a lovely period piece with an excellent newcomer in the lead, and a very strong supporting cast by her side. It’s the kind of movie where you have a strong feeling of knowing where it’s going, and yet you enjoy every mile on the road there. Read the rest of this entry