Blog Archives

Actor Spotlight: Sexy Beast

I was perplexed by this film before watching it.  Nothing major.  Someone had once said to me that it was a complex, hard to follow, puzzle of a film.    Upon watching the movie, I had a different experience.  I did have to turn on the subtitles since the actors were so cockney it was a bit hard to follow, but nothing too complex.  I didn’t find it really complex at all, though there was one mystery that eluded me the entire time.  Who is the Sexy Beast of the title? Read the rest of this entry

Actor Spotlight: Elegy

Based on the novel The Dying Animal by American novelist Philip Roth Elegy, from director Isabel Coixet, Elegy stars  Ben Kingsley (Shindler’s List), Penélope Cruz (Pirates of the Caribbean, Blow) and Patricia Clarkson (Shutter Island).

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Actor’s Spotlight: Schindler’s List

“I’m trying to thank you. I’m saying I couldn’t have done this without you.”

I’m going to start this by stating the obvious. That Schindler’s List is an amazing movie. Loosely based on real events and inspired by the novel, Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally, it’s quite possibly Steven Spielberg’s best movie. It’s a harrowing, at some points disturbing, look at the horrors of the Holocaust. It’s a movie that I think should be shown in every single high school and college history class as a reminder of the evils of hatred and what happened during World War II. It’s a living monument to both those that died during the Holocaust and the survivors. The movie co-stars Ben Kingsley in the pivotal and memorable role of Itzhak Stern, a Jewish accountant hired by Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson) to help run his factory in the Jewish ghetto of Krakow, Poland. Schindler arrives in Poland during the German occupation and quickly sets up a munitions factory for the Nazis using Jewish slave labor. At first, Schindler is only interested in making a fortune through the necessity’s of war, in essence becoming a war profiteer. After seeing first hand the destruction of Krakow and the slaughter of the Jewish people at the hands of the evil Nazi Amon Goeth (Ralph Fiennes), Schindler decides to try to save his workers and as many Jewish people as he can in a plot to smuggle his workers out of Krakow.

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Actor Spotlight: House of Sand and Fog

Personally choosing which Ben Kingsley film to review this month for our actor spotlight was quite easy for me.  I’ve been a fan of Kingsley’s work for years but I have to admit that I for the main part have just seen him in supporting roles.  Roles he excelled in no less but still supporting.  So when I read the synopsis for House of Sand and Fog I was intrigued and geared up to see a more leading role.

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Actor Spotlight: Ben Kingsley

For the month of November, we Devils decided to honor a man who has been in the industry for over 40 years.  One of Hollywood’s underrated actors, we will be reviewing four films of his due to the release of his new movie Hugo releasing this month.  Check back with us each week to find a new review of Krishna Bhanji aka Ben Kingsley.

Week 1 – House of Sand and Fog

Week 2 – Schindler’s List

Week 3 – Elegy

Week 4 – Sexy Beast

Devil’s DVD Disappointment: Shutter Island

Riding the coattails (albeit a few years later) of The Departed, Martin Scorsese once again unleashes questionable Boston accents and Leonardo DiCaprio on the unsuspecting public in Shutter Island. Shutter is a noir-styled tour through a sheltered mental asylum which harbors more than just unbalanced criminals. The head doctor (Kingsley) speaks in tangled euphemisms and the inmates warn visitors of its inescapability as DiCaprio (Teddy Daniels) searches for a missing patient. As soon as Daniels steps off the ferry onto the haunting island, dreamy visions of his deceased wife cloud his thoughts and caution him to not go prying too far into the past. Read the rest of this entry

Episode 12: Shutter Island

This week we go crazy trying to figure out the Scorsese/DiCaprio bromance and why the film’s score sounded so familiar. 

Give us a listen and we’ll tell who number 67 is.

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Shutter Island

In Martin Scorsese’s new flick, U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels and his new partner Chuck Aule arrive at Shutter Island, Massachusetts to investigate the disappearance of a patient at Ashecliffe Hospital for the Criminally Insane. Seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it? Then you don’t know Scorsese. Adapted very faithfully from the novel by Boston crime aficionado Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone), Shutter Island, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley and Michelle Williams, is one part neo-noir, one part psychodrama, with an extra helping of suspense. It’s also chock-full of fantastic actors working very hard to up the creepiness factor in any way they can. All in all, I was very happy with Shutter Island and while it contains a flaw or two, it sustains the tension throughout the picture and keeps you guessing until the very end. Read the rest of this entry

Shutter Island (Devil’s Advocates Review)

Riding the coattails (albeit a few years later) of The Departed, Martin Scorsese once again unleashes questionable Boston accents and Leonardo DiCaprio on the unsuspecting public in Shutter Island. Shutter is a noir-styled tour through a sheltered mental asylum which harbors more than just unbalanced criminals. The head doctor (Kingsley) speaks in tangled euphemisms and the inmates warn visitors of its inescapability as DiCaprio (Teddy Daniels) searches for a missing patient. As soon as Daniels steps off the ferry onto the haunting island, dreamy visions of his deceased wife cloud his thoughts and caution him to not go prying too far into the past. Read the rest of this entry